Comments
Biometrics: Mobile Paymentsí Secret Weapon
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HAnatomi
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HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/20/2014 | 9:29:01 PM
Re: FALSE SENSE OF SECURITY
Talking about security and experience is one thing.  Talking about a false sense of security or experience is another.  It would be fine if we are told that the convenience is thus raised, though at the price of lowered security.  It does not make a false sense of security.  But it would make a false sense of security if we are that the security is also raised.  Apple and others who offer biometric sensors are expected to do something about this.
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
10/20/2014 | 10:50:51 AM
Re: FALSE SENSE OF SECURITY
That definitely is an issue. I've heard people talk about that with EMV Chip-and-PIN payments cards -- if you forgot your PIN they can still override it for you, eliminating that second authentication. But I think most people in the industry feel that that is necessary sometimes for the sake of the customer experience. They don't want to make it impossible to make a payment if one of the two factors doesn't work.
Nathan Golia
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Nathan Golia,
User Rank: Author
10/19/2014 | 10:58:54 PM
Re: fingerprints for payments
I don't know. My wife's fingerprint iPhone lock went south within a month of her buying the phone. Back to password unlock. Unfortunately components like this that depend on high sensitivity are going to be provided by low bidders and one could see the consumer experience falter after a while.
HAnatomi
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HAnatomi,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/10/2014 | 11:12:26 PM
FALSE SENSE OF SECURITY
Biometrics can theoretically be operated together with passwords in two ways, (1) by AND/conjunction or (2) by OR/disjunction.  I would appreciate to hear if someone knows of a biometric product operated by (1).  The users of such products must have been notified that, when falsely rejected by the biometric sensor with the devices finally locked, they would have to see the device reset.  It is the same with the biometrics operated without passwords altogether.

 Biometric products like Apple's Touch ID are generally operated by (2) so that users can unlock the devices by passwords when falsely rejected by the biometric sensors.  This means that the overall vulnerability of the product is the sum of the vulnerability of biometrics (x) and that of a password (y).  The sum (x + y - xy) is necessarily larger than the vulnerability of a password (y), say, the devices with Touch ID and other biometric sensors are less secure than the devices protected only by a password.

 It is very worrying to see so many ICT people being indifferent to the difference between AND/conjunction and OR/disjunction when talking about "using two factors together".
KBurger
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KBurger,
User Rank: Author
10/9/2014 | 2:22:50 PM
Re: Obstacles?
I agree, it's already been noted that just because Apple is Apple and iPhone is iPhone, that will get lots of people interested in mobile payments who never paid attention before. The same no doubt will be true about biometrics security.
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
10/9/2014 | 1:44:52 PM
Re: Obstacles?
I heard recently that there's already been 10 million orders for iPhone 6's. So I think that people are going to be learning through experience at this point. That's a lot of people walking around with biometric-capable phones.
Jonathan_Camhi
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Jonathan_Camhi,
User Rank: Author
10/9/2014 | 1:43:02 PM
Re: fingerprints for payments
Thank you for the comment. That's definitely a key problem that has to be worked out for biometrics and mobile payments to succeed. There's so much interest in biometrics right now, and so much investment, because of the increasing dangers around cyber security right now. I have to think that with all of that effort and investment that biometric readers are growing much more refined in their ability to successfully authenticate someone.
KBurger
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KBurger,
User Rank: Author
10/9/2014 | 1:35:39 PM
Obstacles?
Wow, this seems so obvious and simple -- compelling argument, Paul. But I wonder -- why hasn't this happened sooner? Has the biometric technology simply not been advanced enough? Is it about cost, or standards? Also, although you cite persuasive statistics about the consumer interest in mobile payments, will there be an educational factor around adoption of biometrics? Will consumers need to be persuaded it's not just easier, but also safe -- and potentially safer than card transactions/security?
lwood321
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lwood321,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/9/2014 | 12:58:11 PM
Re: fingerprints for payments
As usual Mr. Schaus is 100% correct.  The reliablity of this technology is proven tens of thousands of times daily and has been for the last 15 years at our local proving grounds known as "The House of Mouse." Now THAT is a real-world test!  If the finger is scanned properly and the software allows the opportunity for multiple positions (as the Iphone does), I am confident in this technology.  Those who are concerned should be careful not to think yesterday's technology compares to today's (and today's is just the beginning). 
pbug
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pbug,
User Rank: Moderator
10/9/2014 | 12:30:03 PM
fingerprints for payments
I use a fingerprint scanner for clocking in at the volunteer ambulance corp that I'm part of.  It does sort of work, sometimes.  Today my thumb works, tomorrow a different finger works, next day none of them work.  If we didn't have a key fob backup half the time we'd never be able to clock in.  Sure, fingerprint readers and scanners have improved over the last few decades (I first encountered one around 1979) but people present their finger tips differently every single time they scan, thus making them far from highly reliable.  Imagine the line at a checkout while people make numerous attempts to scan!


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